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Tuesday, August 22, 2017

Defying Isis (Johnnie Moore)

Everyone (almost everyone) agrees that the Holocaust was a terrible period of time. A real black mark on human history. But something that may not be very dissimilar is going on right now in the Middle East and it is receiving very little attention. About 6 million Jews died in the Holocaust and about the same number of Gentiles died under Adolph Hitler. The numbers are probably not that high with respect to what is happening right now in the Middle East. But what is happening right now in the Middle East is not over, yet.






#News #Politics #Religion



#Persecution #Christianity #Christian



#IslamicState #ISIS #ISIL #RadicalIslam






Inside Judicial Watch: Voter Fraud--The Untold Story





#News #Politics



#Elections #ElectionFraud #VoterFraud #ElectionIntegrity #VotingFraud








Glenn Jacobs, WWE's Kane, Runs for Mayor





#TomWoods #Libertarian



#Politics




On This Day In History > August 22,1776: Redcoats land at Long Island

From The Founding of the United States:




On This Day In History > August 22,1776:
Redcoats land at Long Island

"On this day in 1776, the British arrive at Long Island, between Gravesend and New Utrecht, with “near twenty four thousand men ready to land in a moment,” according to one observer.

General William Howe’s large army came to Long Island hoping to capture New York City and gain control of the Hudson River, a victory that would divide the rebellious colonies in half. Five days later, on August 27, the Redcoats marched against the Patriot position at Brooklyn Heights, overcoming the Americans at Gowanus Pass and then outflanking the entire Continental Army. The Americans suffered 1,000 casualties to the British loss of only 400 men during the fighting. Howe chose not to follow the advice of his subordinates, however, and did not storm the Patriot redoubts at Brooklyn Heights, where he could have taken the Patriots’ military leadership prisoner and ended the rebellion.

General Washington ordered a retreat to Manhattan by boat. The British could easily have prevented this retreat and captured most of the Patriot officer corps, including Washington. However, General William and Admiral Richard Howe still hoped to convince the Americans to rejoin the British empire in the wake of the humiliating defeat, instead of forcing the former colonies into submission after executing Washington and his officers as traitors. On September 11, Benjamin Franklin, John Adams and other congressional representatives reopened negotiations with the Howe brothers on Staten Island. The negotiations fell through when the British refused to accept American independence.

The British captured New York City on September 15; it would remain in British hands until the end of the war." 


#Founding #UnitedStates #America #UnitedStatesOfAmerica #USA 




082217 

III 

Ronald Reagan on Prayer and the Constitution

From Western Journalism:





Monday, August 21, 2017

On Watch Live: El Paso, Benghazi, & Phoenix





#News #Politics




Total Eclipse Darkens Wyoming





#News



#Eclipse #Eclipse2017 #SolarEclipse2017






Chief of Naval Ops Orders Probe into Collisions





#News



#Navy






Raw: Police Kill Barcelona Suspect in Bomb Belt



#News

#Terrorism #Terrorist #Barcelona #Spain


Spectators Watch Total Eclipse in Oregon



#News

#Eclipse #Eclipse2017 #SolarEclipse2017



Eclipse Begins over Madras, Oregon

Eclipse Day. October 21, 2017.



#Eclipse #Eclipse2017 #SolarEclipse2017



NASA TV Media - Eclipse 2017



#Eclipse #Eclipse2017 #SolarEclipse2017



Hawaii Becomes a State

From Harry S Truman National Historic Site:




Aloha! On August 21, 1959, President Eisenhower signed a proclamation making Hawaii the 50th state. Truman called for #Hawaii statehood as early as 1948 in his state of the union message. However, statehood would have to wait until Congress approved a statehood bill. In the meantime, Harry, Bess, and Margaret enjoyed a month-long tropical vacation in Hawaii in 1953, with Harry even receiving an Honorary Degree from the University of Hawaii. 

#UnitedStates #America #UnitedStatesOfAmerica #USA #Hawaii #HI 




082117 

II

Ayn Rand on the Right to Impose Unchosen Obligations

I don't agree with Ayn Rand on everything, but I think that this is a great quote. - JBK



#News #Politics

#Freedom #Slavery #Liberty #Tyranny

#AynRand #Objectivism


Total Solar Eclipse at the Time of Lewis and Clark

From Lewis and Clark National Historic Trail:




Total solar eclipses are rarely observed in North America. But we know that one did occur on June 16, 1806, as this map indicates. This begs the question, “Did Lewis and Clark see it?”

It’s not likely, because there’s no mention of the event in any of the journals. Plus, the men at that time were struggling along the Lolo Trail in the mountains of today’s Idaho – well off the path of the total eclipse. And, chances are, it could have been a cloudy day and any partial eclipse so far from the path of totality wouldn’t have been noticed. 

#Founding #UnitedStates #America #UnitedStatesOfAmerica #USA #Eclipse 






082117 

II 

Watching the solar eclipse safely



#News

#Eclipse #Eclipse2017



Impact of the solar eclipse on the US economy



#News #Eclipse #Eclipse2017

#Business


On This Day In History > August 21,1754, Banastre Tarleton is born In Britain

From The Founding of the United States:




On This Day In History > August 21,1754, Banastre Tarleton is born In Britain

" Banastre Tarleton is born as the fourth child of John Tarleton, the former lord mayor of Liverpool, and a money lender, merchant and slave trader.

After completing his education at Oxford, Tarleton became the most feared officer in the British army during the War for American Independence, memorialized in portraits by Sir Joshua Reynolds and Thomas Gainsborough, as well as on film in The Patriot (2000), starring Mel Gibson, as the basis for the character Colonel William Tavington. The treatment of Patriot prisoners by Tarleton and his Loyalist troops in the Southern Campaign led to the coining of a phrase that came to define British brutality during of the last years of the War for Independence: “Tarleton’s Quarter.”

After the surrender of Charleston, South Carolina, on May 12, 1780, the 3rd Virginia, commanded by Colonel Abraham Buford, was virtually the only organized Patriot formation remaining in South Carolina; Colonel Tarleton had been given the mission to destroy any colonial resistance in the state. At Waxhaws on the North Carolina border, a cavalry charge by Tarleton’s men broke the 350 remaining Patriots under Buford. Tarleton and his Tories proceeded to shoot at the Patriots after their surrender, a move that spawned the term “Tarleton’s Quarter,” which in the eyes of the Patriots meant a brutal death at the hands of a cowardly foe. The Continentals lost 113 killed and 203 captured in the Battle of Waxhaws; British losses totaled 19 men and 31 horses killed or wounded. Although they were routed, the loss became a propaganda victory for the Continentals, as wavering Carolina civilians terrified of Tarleton and their Loyalist neighbors were now prepared to rally to the Patriot cause.

After the British surrender at Yorktown, Virginia, in 1781, Tarleton returned to Britain where he served in Parliament as a representative from Liverpool and argued for the preservation of the slave trade. He became Sir Banastre Tarleton, 1st Baronet, in 1815. He died in 1833." 


#Founding #UnitedStates #America #UnitedStatesOfAmerica #USA 






082117 

II 

James Damore's Firing at Google, and Libertarian Confusion





#TomWoods #Libertarian


President Trump Arrives Back in Washington at The White House After 2 W...



#PresidentTrump #DonaldTrump #DonaldJTrump


Sunday, August 20, 2017

Please Boycott






Happy Birthday, Ron Paul!

From Mises Institute:




#HappyBirthdayRonPaul
 






082017 


Thomas Jefferson Born in Shadwell, Virginia, The United States April 13,1743 Died July 04,1826

From The Founding of the United States:




Thomas Jefferson
Born in Shadwell, Virginia, The United States April 13,1743
Died July 04,1826

"More than a mere renaissance man, Jefferson may actually have been a new kind of man. He was fluent in five languages and able to read two others. He wrote, over the course of his life, over sixteen thousand letters. He was acquainted with nearly every influential person in America, and a great many in Europe as well. He was a lawyer, agronomist, musician, scientist, philosopher, author, architect, inventor, and statesman. Though he never set foot outside of the American continent before adulthood, he acquired an education that rivaled the finest to be attained in Europe. He was clearly the foremost American son of the Enlightenment.

Jefferson was born at Shadwell in Albemarle county, Virginia on April 13, 1743. He was tutored by the Reverend James Maury, a learned man, in the finest classical tradition. He began the study of Latin, Greek, and French at the age of 9. He attended William and Mary College in Williamsburg at sixteen years old, then continued his education in the Law under George Wythe, the first professor of law in America (who later would sign Jefferson's Declaration in 1776). Thomas Jefferson attended the House of Burgesses as a student in 1765 when he witnessed Patrick Henry's defiant stand against the Stamp Act. He gained the Virginia bar and began practice in 1769, and was elected to the House of Burgesses in 1769. It was there that his involvement in revolutionary politics began. He was never a very vocal member, but his writing, his quiet work in committee, and his ability to distill large volumes of information to essence, made him an invaluable member in any deliberative body.

In 1775 when a Virginia convention selected delegates to the Continental Congress, Jefferson was selected as an alternate. It was expected that Payton Randolph, (then Speaker of the Virginia House and president of the Continental Congress too,) would be recalled by the Royal Governor. This did happen and Jefferson went in his place. Thomas Jefferson had a theory about self governance and the rights of people who established habitat in new lands. Before attending the Congress in Philadelphia he codified these thoughts in an article called A Summary View of the Rights of British America. This paper he sent on ahead of him. He fell ill on the road and was delayed for several days. By the time he arrived, his paper had been published as a pamphlet and sent throughout the colonies and on to England where Edmund Burke, sympathetic to the colonial condition, had it reprinted and circulated widely. In 1776 Jefferson, then a member of the committee to draft a declaration of independence, was chosen by the committee to write the draft. This he did, with some minor corrections from James Madison and an embellishment from Franklin, the document was offered to the Congress on the first day of July. The congress modified it somewhat, abbreviating certain wording and removing points that were outside of general agreement. The Declaration was adopted on the Fourth of July.

Jefferson returned to his home not long afterward. His wife and two of his children were very ill, he was tired of being remote from his home, and he was anxious about the development of a new government for his native state.

In June of 1779 he succeeded Patrick Henry as Governor of Virginia. The nation was still at war, and the southern colonies were under heavy attack. Jefferson's Governorship was clouded with hesitation. He himself concluded that the state would be better served by a military man. He declined re-election after his first term and was succeeded by General Nelson of Yorktown.

In 1781 he retired to Monticello, the estate he inherited, to write, work on improved agriculture, and attend his wife. It was during this time that he wrote Notes on the State of Virginia, a work that he never completed. Martha Jefferson died in September of 1782. This event threw Jefferson into a depression that, according to his eldest daughter he might never have recovered" 


#Founder #Founding #UnitedStates #America #UnitedStatesOfAmerica #USA 






082017 



John 8:12

From The Founders, Religion and Government:




John 8:12
New American Standard Bible (NASB)

12 Then Jesus again spoke to them, saying, “I am the Light of the world; he who follows Me will not walk in the darkness, but will have the Light of life.” 






082017 



Abraham Lincoln on Choosing Sides

From The Founders, Religion and Government:




And so should we all. 

#UnitedStates #America #UnitedStatesOfAmerica #USA 

#Christian #Christianity #heritage 







082017 



'United Daughters of the Confederacy' monument to be relocated following vandalism

'United Daughters of the Confederacy' monument to be relocated following vandalism: The 'United Daughters of the Confederacy' monument at 55th and Ward Parkway will be relocated after being vandalized this weekend.

Police officer who survived point-black shooting speaks out



#News #Politics

#Police #BlueLivesMatter

#LawEnforcement


Mark's Mailbox: Of Swamps and Ruins






#News #Politics

#PresidentTrump #DonaldTrump #DonaldJTrump

#Diversity #Multiculturalism #tribalism

There was also a good discussion about the recent uproar over historical statues. Steyn explains that this is an effort to make us forget about our past. It is also an effort to de-legitimize the #Founders. The thinking is: Most of the people who signed the #DeclarationofIndependence were slave owners. Since the Founders were bad people, then the documents that they produced, like the Declaration of Independence and the U.S. #Constitution, are no good. The people behind this movement will then be able to impose their #totalitarianism unimpeded. - JBK

#Freedom #Tyranny #Liberty #Authoritarianism




On This Day In History August 20,1794: Battle of Fallen Timbers

From The Founding of the United States:




On This Day In History August 20,1794:
Battle of Fallen Timbers

"On this day in 1794, General “Mad Anthony” Wayne proves that the fragile young republic can counter a military threat when he puts down Shawnee Chief Blue Jacket’s confederacy near present-day Toledo, Ohio, with the newly created 3,000-man strong Legion of the United States at the Battle of Fallen Timbers.

Although the Treaty of Paris ceded the so-called Northwest Territory, stretching west to the Mississippi River and south to Spanish Florida to the United States, the British failed to abandon their forts in the region and continued to support their Indian allies in skirmishes with American settlers. Two earlier Army expeditions into the Ohio territory by Generals Josiah Harmar and Arthur St. Clair in 1790 and 1791, respectively, failed to end the unrest. In fact, St. Clair’s effort concluded with an Indian victory and 630 dead American soldiers.

Wayne had earned the moniker “mad” for his enthusiastic and successful undertaking of a seemingly impossible mission in 1779 at Stony Point, New York; much of Wayne’s subsequent career involved divesting Native Americans of their land. Following the victory at Yorktown, Wayne traveled to Georgia, where he negotiated treaties with the Creeks and Cherokees. They paid dearly in land for their decision to side with the British, and Georgia paid Wayne in land—giving him a large plantation–for his efforts on their behalf.

When President George Washington confronted a frontier Indian crisis in 1794, he called upon Wayne to bring the ongoing violence to a close. Wayne was victorious and gained much of what would become Ohio and Indiana for the U.S. in the Treaty of Greenville signed a year later." 


#Founding #UnitedStates #America #UnitedStatesOfAmerica #USA 






082017 



The Thomas Jefferson Memorial in Washington, D.C.

From Lewis and Clark National Historic Trail:




Did you know? The idea of the Thomas Jefferson Memorial in Washington, D.C. was passed by Congress in June 1934, but construction did not begin until November 1938. A year later, a ceremony was held in which President Franklin Roosevelt laid the cornerstone of the memorial. It would be nearly five years later when the official dedication took place on April 13, 1943, Thomas Jefferson’s 200th birthday.

The original sculpture of the president was made of plaster; it was replaced with the current 19-foot-tall bronze statue in 1947. (The original was made of plaster due to metal restriction during World War II.)

The memorial, which is always open, sits on 19.2 acres of landscaping on the south end of the Tidal Basin. To assist visitors, National Park Service rangers are on site each day (except Christmas) from 9:30 a.m. to 10:00 p.m. More information is available at: www.nps.gov/thje


#Founder #Founding UnitedStates #America #UnitedStatesOfAmerica #USA 




082017 



Steve Forbes on Trump, Taxes, and 100 Years of Forbes Magazine





#News #Politics #Business






Saturday, August 19, 2017

Jury Nullification at Work: Free Speech Trumps Statute, Jury Concludes



#TomWoods #Libertarian

#News #Politics

#FreeSpeech #FreedomOfSpeech



Ben Franklin on Safety and Liberty

From The Founding of the United States:




Unmasking the leftist Antifa movement: Activists seek peace through violence


(CNN)On the morning of Donald Trump's inauguration, Keval Bhatt hunted through a closet in his parents' Virginia home for the darkest clothes he could find.

http://www.cnn.com/2017/08/18/us/unmasking-antifa-anti-fascists-hard-left/index.html

The Real George Orwell



#TomWoods #Libertarian

#Socialism #Socialist

#Politics #Freedom #Liberty #Totalitarian

#Collectivism






On This Day In History August 19,1779: Americans raid Paulus Hook, New Jersey

From The Founding of the United States:



On This Day In History August 19,1779:
Americans raid Paulus Hook, New Jersey

"On this day in 1779, a Patriot force consisting of 300 men led by Major Henry “Light Horse Harry” Lee assaults the defensive positions of the British at Paulus Hook, New Jersey, now known as Jersey City. Lee wins one of only eight medals awarded by Congress during the war–and the only one awarded to a soldier beneath the rank of general–for his role in this action.

Although Lee planned to attack immediately after midnight, his forces set off later than expected and lost some of their number in their march through the surrounding marshland. Still, the 23-year-old College of New Jersey (now Princeton University) graduate was able to capture the position, possibly because the British mistook the Patriots for Hessian mercenaries until they reached the fort’s gate.

Although the Patriots damaged the fort, took 50 lives and 158 prisoners, they failed to destroy the structure or spike its cannon. With daybreak approaching, Lee decided to withdraw, concerned that the British would send reinforcements from New York City across the Hudson River. Thus the fort remained in British control until the war ended and the British evacuated and sailed for home on November 22, 1783. The neighborhood erected a monument in memory of the battle in 1903.

Despite the limited success of the action, it gave Patriot morale a major boost. Following the assault, several officers jealous of the flamboyant Lee’s success drafted a substantial set of charges, including reckless endangerment of his men, against him, leading to his court martial. Lee offered his own persuasive defense and was not only vindicated but praised for his actions by the court; he was then awarded the Congressional medal." 


#Founding #UnitedStates #America #UnitedStatesOfAmerica #USA 






081917 

VII 

Where Do Rights Come From?




#TomWoods #Libertarian

#Politics

#NaturalRights








Why Liberty Is So Hard to Sell -- And Can We Do Anything About It?





#TomWoods #Libertarian



#News #Politics



#Freedom #Liberty




Sen. Cruz on The Wells Report - August 17, 2017





#News #Politiics



#TedCruz #SenatorCruz




Sen. Cruz on Washington Watch with Tony Perkins - August 17, 2017





#News #Politics



#SenatorCruz #TedCruz




Friday, August 18, 2017

The Remedy for Hate Speech

From Mises Institute:




Thomas Sowell on Slavery






Thomas Jefferson on the Preferred Type of Government

From The Founding of the United States:




Sen. Cruz on The Mark Davis Show - August 15, 2017





#News #Politics



#TedCruz #SenatorCruz






Senator Burr Discusses President Trump's Latest Remarks on Charlottesville





#News #Politics



#RichardBurr #SenatorBurr


State of Technology 2017

I was glad to partner with the Fargo Moorhead West Fargo Chamber of Commerce to host the 2017 State of Technology Conference today in Fargo. Technological innovations are reaching all corners of North Dakota, acting as the third wave in our state’s economic growth and creating opportunities in both emerging and traditional industries. The rise of our technology sector comes from the business climate and entrepreneurial culture we have worked to build, and its potential impacts are limitless. #StateofTech17 For more on the conference, visit: bit.ly/2i68KqJ







#News #Politics



#JohnHoeven #SenatorHoeven






Blunt Highlights Need to Expand Rural Broadband at Missouri State Fair

During a press conference at the Missouri State Fair, U.S. Senator Roy Blunt (Mo.) underscored the need to expand high speed broadband in rural areas, citing its impact on small businesses, telemedicine, education, and agriculture.







#News #Politics



#RoyBlunt #SenatorBlunt






On This Day In History August 18,1780: British win at Fishing Creek, lose at Musgrove’s Mill

From The Founding of the United States:




On This Day In History August 18,1780:
British win at Fishing Creek, lose at Musgrove’s Mill

"On this day in 1780, following the Continental Army’s disastrous loss two days earlier at the Battle of Camden, two bloody engagements leave the Loyalist and Patriot forces each with one more victory in South Carolina’s brutal civil war.

Led by the fearsome horseman Lieutenant Colonel Banastre Tarleton, 350 Loyalists located a Patriot force commanded by Brigadier General Thomas Sumter, known as “The Gamecock” for his fearless aggression, about 40 miles from Camden. Tarleton caught the Americans totally unprepared, killing 150, wounding and capturing 300 and freeing 100 British prisoners at Fishing Creek, South Carolina. Loyalist losses were just 16 killed. This battle made Tarleton, in eyes of the British, a national hero. Coming just after the Patriot loss at Camden, it appeared that the British would soon add the Carolinas to Georgia and possess what British General Henry Clinton called “three stripes… of the detestable thirteen.”

However, that same day, a second battle gave the Patriots a spark of hope. At Musgrove’s Mill on the Enoree River, Patriot Colonels Elijah Clarke and Isaac Shelby commanded a militia force that repelled an attack by Loyalists, killing 63, wounding 90 and capturing another 70. Patriot losses were only four killed and eight wounded and a day that could have cemented Patriot disaster ended instead in a draw. The site of the Patriots’ desperately needed victory is now a South Carolina state park.

Shelby would go on to guide the Patriots to a brutal victory at Kings Mountain, near the border of the Carolinas, on October 7, after which his men would proceed to shoot and hang many of their Loyalist, and fellow Carolinian, prisoners." 


#Founding #UnitedStates #America #UnitedStatesOfAmerica #USA 






081817 

VI 

Hot Mic - The Big Lie - 08/15/17



#News #Politics

#BillWhittle #PoliticalCorrectness

#Democrats #Republicans

#Charlottesville

#Fascism #Statism #Collectivism #Marxism #Progressivism #Communism

#Individualism

#Liberal #Conservative

#DonaldTrump #DonaldJTrump

#Socialism #Nazism






Ben Shapiro: How Can Conservatives Start Winning The Culture War?



#Politics

#Press #NewsMedia #MSM #Journalism #Journalists

#Elections

#Marketing




Jordan Peterson: How to Gain Self-Respect

I Don't Care About Charlottesville, the KKK, or White Supremacy

It has been said that more journalists show up at KKK rallies than actual KKK members. - JBK



#Press #NewsMedia #MSM #Journalism #Journalists




Maintaining and Interpreting Civil War Monuments

From Gettysburg National Military Park:




Across the country, the National Park Service maintains and interprets monuments, markers, and plaques that commemorate and memorialize those who fought during the Civil War. These memorials represent an important, if controversial, chapter in our Nation’s history. The National Park Service is committed to preserving these memorials while simultaneously educating visitors holistically about the actions, motivations, and causes of the soldiers and states they commemorate. A hallmark of American progress is our ability to learn from our history. 

#NationalPark #CivilWar #Memorial 




081817 

VI 


The U.S. Constitution Part Three of 44 The Preamble

From The Founders, Religion and Government:




The U.S. Constitution
Part Three of 44
The Preamble

Our Constitution is unique. Even though the United States is a relatively young country, ours is the oldest written constitution in the world. This September it will be 230 years old. The average life span of a constitution since 1789 is just 17 years. This is illustrated by the fact that since ours was written France has had more than a dozen. Our Constitution is also unique in that it lists the limits on the government and the authority granted to the government by the people. The constitutions of other nations detail the rights of the people granted by the government. Former British Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher pointed out this difference,

“Europe will never be like America. Europe is a product of history. America is a product of philosophy.”

The Constitution, like the Declaration of Independence, is divided into parts. It contains seven articles, the signatories, 27 amendments, and a Preamble:

“We the People of the United States, in Order to form a more perfect Union, establish Justice, insure domestic Tranquility, provide for the common defense, promote the general Welfare, and secure the Blessings of Liberty to ourselves and our Posterity, do ordain and establish this Constitution for the United States of America.”

The Preamble lays out the purpose of the document. In modern English it says:

We are trying to set up a better government, one which will be just and peaceful, one which will defend the people and enact laws for their benefit, one which will protect not just our rights but those of our descendants.

Perhaps one of the most misunderstood parts of the Preamble is the phrase “general welfare.” This phrase actually appears in two places in the Constitution. The second time is in Article One. There are two things to note here. First, the Preamble does not have the force of law. It is an introduction. It details no powers. The second is the meaning of that phrase. For the Framers, welfare meant health, happiness, prosperity, or well-being. It did not mean to provide for assistance for the poor. As for the use of the phrase in Article One, James Madison, who attended every meeting of the convention and was one of the primary authors of the Federalist Papers, pointed out the misinterpretation of this phrase:

"With respect to the words 'general welfare,' I have always regarded them as qualified by the detail of powers connected with them. To take them in a literal and unlimited sense would be a metamorphosis of the Constitution into a character which there is a host of proofs was not contemplated by its creators."

He also noted that helping the poor, while something that a society has a moral obligation to do, is not a function of the federal government,

"The government of the United States is a definite government, confined to specified objects. It is not like the state governments, whose powers are more general. Charity is no part of the legislative duty of the government."

Why is it that our Constitution has stood so long when others nations have had to rewrite theirs? Could it be the purposes laid out, to benefit the welfare of the people? Could it be the limitations it places? Whatever the reasons, we should be grateful for the effort and foresight of the Framers of the Constitution. And we should follow the advice of the Declaration:

“Prudence, indeed, will dictate that Governments long established should not be changed for light and transient causes.” 


#Founding #Founders #UnitedStates #America #UnitedStatesOfAmerica #USA #Constitution 






081817 

VI 


Get Ready, Ronald!

From Neal Wright:


#News #Politics

Thursday, August 17, 2017

Predominantly Black Dallas Group Forms To Protect Confederate Monuments

DALLAS (CBSDFW.COM) – The debate about Confederate statues in Dallas intensified on Monday as a group made up of predominantly African Americans called for the monuments to remain standing.

http://dfw.cbslocal.com/2017/08/14/dallas-group-forms-to-protect-confederate-monuments/#.WZJtOGgwHgA.facebook

Frequent Instances of Superintending Providence

From The Founders, Religion and Government:




"All of us who were engaged in the struggle must have observed frequent instances of superintending Providence in our favor. To that kind Providence we owe this happy opportunity of consulting in peace on the means of establishing our future national felicity. And have we now forgotten that powerful friend? Or do we imagine that we no longer need His assistance? I have lived, Sir, a long time, and the longer I live, the more convincing proofs I see of this truth - that god governs in the affairs of men. And if a sparrow cannot fall to the ground without His notice, is it probable that an Empire can rise without his aid? We have been assured, Sir, in the Sacred Writings, that except the Lord build the House they labor in vain who build it. I firmly believe this, — and I also believe that without his concurring Aid, we shall succeed in this political Building no better than the Builders of Babel: We shall be divided by our little partial local interests; our Projects will be confounded, and we ourselves shall become a Reproach and Bye word down to future Ages."
~ Benjamin Franklin, Speech to the Constitutional Convention (June 28, 1787) 


#Founder #Founding #UnitedStates #America #UnitedStatesOfAmerica #USA 






081717 

V