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Saturday, March 31, 2012

Current TV Dismisses Keith Olbermann

Excerpt from an article in

The New York Times
Saturday, March 31, 2012

Current TV Dismisses Keith Olbermann

By BRIAN STELTER 10:06 p.m. | Updated

For nearly a year now, Al Gore and Joel Hyatt have been building their liberal cable news channel, Current TV, with the mercurial television anchorman Keith Olbermann at its center.

This week, the center collapsed.

Current said on Friday afternoon that it had fired Mr. Olbermann - one of the nation's most prominent progressive speakers - just a year into his five-year, $50 million contract. It was the culmination of months of murky disputes between Mr. Olbermann and the channel that he was supposed to save from the throes of ratings oblivion.

Yet as inevitable as it might have seemed to some in the television business who know the long history of antipathy between Mr. Olbermann and his employers, it was nonetheless shocking to his fans, to his detractors and to staff members at Current when the announcement was made.

Forty-five minutes afterward, in a stream of Twitter messages, Mr. Olbermann threatened to take legal action against the channel and said its claims about him were untrue. In part because of the prospect of litigation, executives at Current declined to comment on the firing on Friday. But they immediately named as his replacement Eliot Spitzer, the former governor of New York, who took over Mr. Olbermann's 8 p.m. time slot on Friday night.

By replacing Mr. Olbermann, Mr. Spitzer is getting a second shot at an 8 p.m. talk show; in 2010, two years after he resigned the governorship after he admitted having patronized a prostitution ring, he led a short-lived show on CNN. It was canceled in mid-2011.

Marriage Maintenance When Money Is Tight - Your Money

Excerpt from an article in

The New York Times
Saturday, March 31, 2012

Marriage Maintenance When Money Is Tight - Your Money

By TARA SIEGEL BERNARD

Chronic unemployment is putting many couples’ marital vows to the test — particularly the part that refers to “for richer, for poorer.”

With far less money coming in each month, many families have been forced to cut back, borrow money from family and friends and maybe even drain their savings. Millions, too, have lost their homes to foreclosure. And then there is the toll that joblessness is taking on their relationships.

Even Ben S. Bernanke, the Federal Reserve chairman, expressed concern earlier this week for the ranks of the long-term unemployed, or those out of work for six months or more. Not only do their bank accounts suffer, he noted, but so do their future earnings potential, their health and the prospects for their children. So it’s not surprising that several marital therapists report that more couples are filing into their offices — when they can afford to — to try to work through their problems.

Maggie Baker, a psychologist in the Philadelphia area who focuses on money issues, said the husband in a couple she recently met with had been unemployed for more than a year. And while his wife was initially supportive, she had started to feel the burden of supporting the family on her own.

“She is watching her husband shrivel and feel ashamed and humiliated, yet unable to do anything because he’s lost his motivation,” Dr. Baker said. “When it goes on seemingly forever, that is when people begin to wear. Then it feels like a permanent change, and a permanent change to the negative, and people react very strongly to that.” In situations like these, certain patterns often emerge. The unemployed partner begins to feel discouraged and withdraws, no longer sharing what he or she is doing to find work. And, eventually, that makes the working partner feel as if the spouse isn’t doing enough. Communication breaks down, and resentments build — at the very moment they need to hold each other up.

Obama: Buffett Rule tax hike will 'make this country a little fairer' - The Hill's Video

President Obama urged lawmakers to "make this country a little fairer" and pass legislation that would raise taxes on those making more than $1 million annually. 
"Congress is going to vote on what’s called the Buffett Rule: If you make more than $1 million a year, you should pay at least the same percentage of your income in taxes as middle class families do," Obama said in his weekly address. "On the other hand, if you make under $250,000 a year – like 98 percent of American families do – your taxes shouldn’t go up."
The president the tax increase would help shrink the deficit and allow the government invest in "education, research and technology, a strong military, and retirement programs like Medicare and Social Security."

The Joint Committee on Taxation (JCT) said, in an estimate provided by Sen. Sheldon Whitehouse's office, that the measure would raise close to $47 billion between 2012 and 2022. 

For more, click the link below: 

Obama: Buffett Rule tax hike will 'make this country a little fairer' - The Hill's Video

Defense Department seeks new authorities for counterterrorism fight - The Hill's DEFCON Hill

As the Pentagon begins to wind down the war in Afghanistan, the smaller conflicts elite U.S. forces are fighting around the world are heating up.
But DoD needs more than just men and materiel to meet these challenges. It needs additional authority from Congress to do so. 
"Most of the authorities that we have right now are narrowly construed to counterterrorism ...  [but] I think for some countries we may need a little bit more flexibility to go in there," Michael Sheehan, assistant secretary of defense for special operations and low-intensity conflict, told lawmakers on Tuesday.
The majority of counterterrorism missions by U.S. special forces have been focused on al Qaeda and Taliban cells in Afghanistan and the Middle East region.
But growing numbers and types of threats, particularly in Africa and South America, require a new approach to U.S. counterterrorism operations, Sheehan told members of the Senate Armed Services’ subcommittee on emerging threats and capabilities. 
For more, click the link below:


Defense Department seeks new authorities for counterterrorism fight - The Hill's DEFCON Hill

Government and advertisers have different ideas about 'Do Not Track' - The Hill's Hillicon Valley

The Obama administration and the technology industry have touted the creation of a "Do Not Track" button to help consumers protect their privacy online, but the government and advertisers are not on the same page about what the button will do.
The Federal Trade Commission first proposed a Do Not Track button in 2010. The concept is modeled on the agency's popular "Do Not Call" list, which allows consumers to opt out of receiving telemarketing calls.
FTC Chairman Jon Leibowitz urged Web companies to voluntarily set up a system for users to opt out of online tracking and warned that legislation could be necessary if they failed to act.
Last month, all of the major Web browsers promised to create a Do Not Track feature, and the Digital Advertising Alliance, a coalition of advertising trade groups, said that by the end of the year, they would stop displaying targeted ads to users who had selected the feature in their browsers.
The commitment was announced as part of the White House's unveiling of its "Privacy Bill of Rights" – a set of principles about how companies should handle users' personal data.
Leibowitz praised the companies for "stepping up" to his challenge and said the feature would ensure "consumers have greater choice and control over how they are tracked online."
But Mike Zaneis, general counsel of the Interactive Advertising Bureau, a member of the Digital Advertising Alliance, said the name "Do Not Track" is a "complete misnomer."
For more, click the link below:

Government and advertisers have different ideas about 'Do Not Track' - The Hill's Hillicon Valley

5 key questions for the Supreme Court to consider in a healthcare decision - The Hill's Healthwatch

5 key questions for the Supreme Court to consider in a healthcare decision - The Hill's Healthwatch

Shell marches toward Arctic drilling as EPA permits upheld

Shell marches toward Arctic drilling as EPA permits upheld

Boehner: Obama needs to press Senate to act on energy bills - The Hill's Video

Boehner: Obama needs to press Senate to act on energy bills - The Hill's Video

Seven Plead Guilty in Wide-Ranging Corruption Scheme at the Naval Fleet Readiness Center in San Diego

Seven Plead Guilty in Wide-Ranging Corruption Scheme at the Naval Fleet Readiness Center in San Diego 

U.S. Attorney’s OfficeMarch 28, 2012
  • Southern District of California(619) 557-5610
United States Attorney Laura E. Duffy announced today that seven individuals, including four Navy officials, Donald Vangundy, Kiet Luc, David Lindsay, and Brian Delaney; and three defense contractors, Michael Graven, John Newman, and Paul Grubiss, each pleaded guilty before United States Magistrate Judge Bernard G. Skomal in connection with a wide-ranging fraud and corruption scheme at the Naval Air Station (NAS) North Island in Coronado, California. As part of the conspiracy, defense contractors provided Navy officials with over one million dollars in personal benefits, including cash, checks, retail gift cards, flat screen television sets, luxury massage chairs, home furniture and appliances, bicycles costing thousands of dollars, model airplanes, and home remodeling services. In return, the Navy officials placed millions of dollars in fraudulent orders with the defense contractors.
Four of the defendants who pleaded guilty were Navy officials employed at the Navy’s Fleet Readiness Center (FRC) located at NAS North Island. All four worked in the Navy’s E2/C2 aircraft program, which is dedicated to maintaining the tactical readiness of the Navy’s E-2 and C-2 aircrafts. The Grumman E-2 Hawkeye is an American all-weather, aircraft carrier-capable tactical airborne early warning aircraft. Since entering combat during the Vietnam War, the E-2 has served the U.S. Navy around the world, acting as the electronic “eyes of the fleet.” The C-2 Greyhound is a derivative of the E-2 Hawkeye, which shares wings and power plants with the E-2, but has a widened fuselage with a rear loading ramp. These aircraft are considered critical components of the U.S. Navy’s carrier air wings.
Among the Navy official defendants, Donald Vangundy oversaw tool control for the E2/C2 program and was promoted to supervise and authorize the purchase and replacement of tools for all FRC programs. Kiet Luc was the liaison and coordinator for tools in the E2/C2 program and was responsible for maintaining and controlling the tool program. David Lindsay was the supervisory production controller for the E2/C2 program, and Brian Delaney was the E2/C2 deputy program manager. Between them, these four former Navy officials received a total of more than $1 million in cash, goods, and services for their personal use, all fraudulently charged to and paid for by the Defense Department.
The remaining three defendants were owners or employees of various defense contractors that provided goods or services for NAS North Island. Michael Graven was the owner and operator of X&D Supply Inc., a contractor located in Carlsbad, California. The Navy paid X&D at least $2.26 million in connection with the fraud. John Newman was a sales manager at (and the former owner of) a defense contractor identified in the charging document as “Company A,” located in Poway, California. The Navy paid Company A at least $3.31 million in connection with the fraud. Paul Grubiss was a sales manager of a defense contractor identified in the charging document as “Company B,” also located in Poway, California. The Navy paid Company B approximately $1 million in connection with the fraud. Also implicated in the scheme was Jesse Denome, the owner of JD Machine Tech Inc.
As part of the scheme, the defense contractors prepared and submitted fraudulent invoices to the Department of Defense, making it appear that they were billing the Department for goods and services within the scope of legitimate government contracts. In fact, the Defense Department was unknowingly paying for, among other things, the cost of personal benefits provided to the Navy officials. Compounding the cost of the fraud, the defense contractors also routinely charged a markup on the fraudulent invoices. Ultimately, the Defense Department paid over $5.5 million in connection with the fraudulent invoices submitted by the defense contractor defendants.
Two of the Navy official defendants, Vangundy and Luc, also pleaded guilty to filing false tax returns for knowingly failing to report the value of the unlawful benefits provided to them by defense contractors. Graven also pleaded guilty to aiding and assisting in the filing of a false tax return by his business, X&D, for knowingly taking improper tax deductions for the illegal payments to the benefit of the Navy official defendants.
According to United States Attorney Duffy, the investigation into possible corruption at NAS North Island was initiated on the basis of citizen complaints. These complaints followed the July 2009 indictment of six individuals on fraud and corruption charges centered at the Space and Naval Warfare Systems Command (SPAWAR). As part of the SPAWAR corruption case, the government publicized a hotline dedicated to the reporting of possible waste, fraud, and abuse related to government and military contracts.
United States Attorney Duffy lauded the citizens who came forward and the coordinated efforts of the law enforcement agencies that participated in this long-running investigation, known as “Country Store,” including the Federal Bureau of Investigation, the Defense Criminal Investigative Service, the Internal Revenue Service-Criminal Investigation, the Naval Criminal Investigative Service, and the General Services Administration (GSA)-Office of Inspector General. In doing so, she emphasized that federal law enforcement agencies in the Southern District of California were committed to rooting out corruption in defense contracts and purchasing, which cheats the American taxpayer and our nation’s military readiness.
U.S. Attorney Duffy noted that the investigation is ongoing and urged anyone with information relating to waste, fraud, and abuse in government contracting to contact the Procurement Fraud Working Group hotline at sandiego.procurementfraud@usdoj.gov or to call 1-877-NO-BRIBE.
FBI Special Agent in Charge Keith Slotter commented, “Public corruption is the FBI’s number one criminal priority. It seriously undermines the people’s trust in their government and gives an unfair economic advantage to those who trade the public’s interest for their own personal gain. The FBI thoroughly investigates allegations of public corruption, and we remind the public to notify us, as they are sometimes the one person that can make a difference.”
Chris Hendrickson, Special Agent in Charge, Defense Criminal Investigative Service, Western Field Office said, “We are extremely pleased at this outcome, which yet again sends the message that corruption will be vigorously investigated and prosecuted. While the vast majority of Navy officials and contractors are honest in their work, some choose to abuse the public trust. This investigation clearly attests that those who compromise the integrity of the United States will face their day of reckoning. Corruption of this nature strikes at the heart of our national security and erodes public confidence. The Defense Criminal Investigative Service will use all tools available—our ability to track worldwide financial dealings, our advanced cyber capabilities, our worldwide law enforcement alliances—to protect taxpayers’ interests.”
Leslie P. DeMarco, Special Agent in Charge of IRS-Criminal Investigation (IRS-CI), Los Angeles Field Office said, “The Navy officials and defense contractors sought illicit opportunities to profit or gain other personal advantages at the expense of other law abiding businesses and taxpayers. Bribery and corruption schemes corrode the American financial and tax system. Today’s actions enforce IRS-CI’s commitment to work with our law enforcement partners, leveraging resources, to investigate and put an end to fraud by government officials.”
Geoffrey Cherrington, Assistant Inspector General for Investigations of GSA’s Inspector General’s Office stated, “The results of this case clearly demonstrate the tireless efforts of our special agents and our partners in law enforcement to protect the taxpayer. If you commit fraud, we are watching.”
The pleas are subject to final acceptance by United States District Judge Roger T. Benitez at or before sentencing. Sentencing for all seven of the defendants is currently scheduled for July 2, 2012, before Judge Benitez.
Defendants
Donald Vangundy, age 54, Chula Vista, California
Kiet Luc, age 53, San Diego, California
Brian Delaney, age 55, La Mesa, California
David Lindsay, age 57, San Diego, California
John Newman, age 51, Poway, California
Michael Graven, age 43, Carlsbad, California
Paul Grubiss, age 39, Wickliffe, Ohio
Summary of Charges
Count one: conspiracy to commit wire fraud, in violation of Title 18, United States Code, Section 1349 (all defendants)—maximum penalties: 20 years in prison, $250,000 fine, term of supervised release of three years, restitution, forfeiture, and $100 special assessment.
Count two: conspiracy to commit bribery, in violation of Title 18, United States Code, Section 371 (defendants Vangundy and Grubiss)—maximum penalties: five years in prison, $250,000 fine, term of supervised release of three years, restitution, forfeiture, and $100 special assessment.
Count three: filing a false tax return, in violation of Title 26, United States Code, Section 7206(1) (defendant Vangundy)—maximum penalties: three years in prison, $250,000 fine, term of supervised release of one year, restitution, costs of prosecution, and $100 special assessment.
Count four: filing a false tax return, in violation of Title 26, United States Code, Section 7206(1) (defendant Luc)—maximum penalties: three years in prison, $250,000 fine, term of supervised release of one year, restitution, costs of prosecution, and $100 special assessment.
Count five: aiding and assisting in a false tax return, in violation of Title 26, United States Code, Section 7206(2) (defendant Graven)—maximum penalties: three years in prison, $250,000 fine, term of supervised release of one year, restitution, costs of prosecution, and $100 special assessment.
Investigating Agencies
Federal Bureau of Investigation
Defense Criminal Investigative Service
Internal Revenue Service-Criminal Investigation
Naval Criminal Investigative Service
General Services Administration-Office of Inspector General

Queens Man Found Guilty in Manhattan Federal Court for Conspiracy and Attempting to Provide Material Support to Hizballah

Queens Man Found Guilty in Manhattan Federal Court for Conspiracy and Attempting to Provide Material Support to Hizballah 

U.S. Attorney’s OfficeMarch 28, 2012
  • Southern District of New York(212) 637-2600
Preet Bharara, the United States Attorney for the Southern District of New York, announced that PATRICK NAYYAR, a citizen of India who had been residing illegally in the United States, was found guilty yesterday in Manhattan federal court of five counts related to support he attempted to provide Hizballah, a designated foreign terrorist organization. NAYYAR was convicted after a seven-day jury trial before U.S. District Judge Robert W. Sweet.
According to the superseding indictment filed in Manhattan federal court and the evidence presented at trial:
Between July 2009 and September 2009, NAYYAR and his co-conspirator, Conrad Stanisclaus Mulholland, agreed to provide weapons, ammunition, and vehicles to Hizballah, a U.S. designated foreign terrorist organization based in Lebanon. During a series of meetings with a confidential informant working with the FBI, who represented himself as able to deliver materials to Hizballah, NAYYAR and Mulholland agreed to sell guns, ammunition, vehicles, bulletproof vests, and night vision goggles to the confidential informant. During these meetings, NAYYAR and Mulholland provided the confidential informant with a handgun, a box of ammunition, and a pick-up truck, believing that he would deliver the items to Hizballah in Lebanon.
NAYYAR was charged in the Southern District of New York in October 2009, following his arrest in the Eastern District of New York at his residence in Queens, New York, in September 2009 on a separate charge.
***
NAYYAR, 48, was convicted of:
  • count one—conspiring to provide material support or resources to a foreign terrorist organization;
  • count two—attempting to provide material support or resources to a foreign terrorist organization;
  • count three—conspiring to make or receive a contribution of funds, goods, or services to, and for the benefit of, Hizballah;
  • count four—attempting to make a contribution of funds, goods, or services to, and for the benefit of, Hizballah; and
  • count five—conspiring to traffic in firearms and ammunition.
Count one and count two each carry a maximum sentence of 15 years in prison; count three and count four each carry a maximum sentence of 20 years in prison; and count five carries a maximum sentence of five years in prison. In total, NAYYAR faces a maximum sentence of 75 years in prison. He is scheduled to be sentenced by Judge Sweet on September 25, 2012 at 4:30 p.m.
NAYYAR’s co-conspirator, Mulholland, 45, who is not a citizen of the U.S. and resides abroad, left the U.S. before charges were filed and remains at large. The charges against Mulholland are pending, and he is presumed innocent unless and until proven guilty.
Mr. Bharara praised the investigative work of the FBI and the New York Joint Terrorism Task Force.
The case is being handled by the Office’s Terrorism and International Narcotics Unit. Assistant United States Attorneys Sean Buckley and Stephen Ritchin are in charge of the prosecution.

Former San Juan Police Department Officer Convicted for Role in Providing Security for Drug Transactions

Former San Juan Police Department Officer Convicted for Role in Providing Security for Drug Transactions 

U.S. Department of JusticeMarch 22, 2012
  • Office of Public Affairs(202) 514-2007/TDD (202) 514-1888
WASHINGTON—A former officer with the San Juan, Puerto Rico Municipal Police Department was convicted by a federal jury yesterday for his role in providing security for drug transactions, announced Assistant Attorney General Lanny A. Breuer of the Justice Department’s Criminal Division, U.S. Attorney Rosa E. Rodriguez-Velez of the District of Puerto Rico, and Special Agent in Charge Joseph S. Campbell of the FBI’s San Juan Field Office.
Arcadio Hernandez-Soto, 35, was convicted in San Juan of three counts of conspiracy to possess with intent to distribute more than five kilograms of cocaine, four counts of attempting to possess with the intent to distribute more than five kilograms of cocaine, and four counts of possession of a firearm in furtherance of a drug transaction. Hernandez-Soto was charged in an indictment unsealed on October 6, 2010, along with 89 law enforcement officers in Puerto Rico and 44 other individuals, as part of the FBI undercover operation known as Guard Shack.
According to the evidence presented in court, Hernandez-Soto provided security for what he believed were illegal cocaine deals on May 8, 2009; June 4, 2009; July 23, 2009; and July 13, 2010, but which in fact were part of the undercover FBI operation. According to information presented at trial, Amaro-Santiago was employed as a member of the San Juan Police Department but acted as a security guard for what he believed were cocaine deals by frisking the buyer, providing protection for the deal, and escorting the buyer in and out of the transaction. Information presented at trial also showed that Hernandez-Soto recruited other police officers to participate in the second, third, and fourth deals.
In return for the security he provided, Amaro-Santiago received a cash payment of between $2,000 and $3,000 for each transaction.
U.S. District Judge Carmen C. Cerezo did not schedule a sentencing date. At sentencing, Hernandez-Soto faces a mandatory minimum sentence of 90 years in prison and a maximum penalty of life in prison.
The case was prosecuted by Trial Attorneys John P. Pearson and Richard B. Evans of the Criminal Division’s Public Integrity Section. The case was investigated by the FBI. The U.S. Attorney’s Office for the District of Puerto Rico also participated in the investigation and prosecution of this case.

Former Upper Big Branch Mine Superintendent Pleads Guilty to Felony Conspiracy

Former Upper Big Branch Mine Superintendent Pleads Guilty to Felony Conspiracy 

U.S. Attorney’s OfficeMarch 29, 2012
  • Southern District of West Virginia(304) 345-2200
BECKLEY, WV—Gary May, 43, of Bloomingrose, West Virginia, pleaded guilty today in federal court before U.S. District Judge Irene C. Berger to conspiracy to impede the Mine Safety and Health Administration’s (MSHA) enforcement efforts at Massey Energy Company’s Upper Big Branch mine (UBB) between February 2008 and April 5, 2010. Upper Big Branch was the site of a fatal explosion on April 5, 2010 that killed 29 miners. May was the mine’s superintendent at the time of the explosion.
In February 2012, U.S. Attorney for the Southern District of West Virginia R. Booth Goodwin, II filed a one-count information against May, charging him with conspiracy to defraud the United States by impeding MSHA in carrying out its lawful functions.
“People who run coal mines have a fundamental obligation to be honest with mine regulators,” said U.S. Attorney Goodwin. “When mine operators resort to tricks and deceit to keep government officials in the dark, our mine safety system unravels and miners are put in harm’s way. The least we can do for coal miners is protect the integrity of the laws designed to keep them safe.”
“I’m pleased that Mr. May is cooperating with our investigation,” U.S. Attorney Goodwin continued. “We hope he can give us a better picture of what was going on at this company.”
May admitted that he and others conspired to impede MSHA in administering and enforcing mine health and safety laws at UBB. He acknowledged giving advance warning of MSHA inspections, often using code phrases to avoid detection. May also admitted to concealing health and safety violations when he knew inspections were imminent. The violations concealed included poor airflow in the mine, piles of loose and combustible coal, and scarcities of rock dust, which prevents mine explosions.
May also acknowledged that he ordered a mine examination book to be falsified. May said he told miners to rewire the methane gas detector on a piece of mine equipment so the equipment could run illegally.
May faces up to five years in prison and a $250,000 fine when he is sentenced on August 9, 2012.
The FBI and the U.S. Department of Labor’s Office of Inspector General are handling the investigation. Counsel to the U.S. Attorney for the Southern District of West Virginia Steve Ruby is handling the prosecution.

JetBlue Pilot Charged with Interference with a Flight Crew

JetBlue Pilot Charged with Interference with a Flight Crew 

U.S. Attorney’s OfficeMarch 28, 2012
  • Northern District of Texas(214) 659-8600
AMARILLO, TX—A federal criminal complaint was filed in the Northern District of Texas today that charges JetBlue pilot Clayton Frederick Osbon, 49, with interference with a flight crew, announced U.S. Attorney for the Northern District of Texas Sarah R. SaldaƱa.
According to the affidavit filed with the complaint, Osbon, a pilot working JetBlue Flight 191 from New York’s John F. Kennedy (JFK) Airport to Las Vegas, according to witnesses, arrived at JFK later than he should have for the flight and missed the crew briefing. As the plane was leaving JFK and climbing in altitude in its scheduled five-hour flight, Osbon said something to the first officer (FO) about being evaluated by someone, but the FO did not know what he meant. Osbon then talked about his church and the need to “focus” and asked the FO to take the controls and work the radios. Osbon began talking about religion, but, according to the FO, his statements were not coherent.
The affidavit goes on to say that the FO became concerned when Osbon said “things just don’t matter.” According to the FO, Osbon yelled over the radio to air traffic control and instructed them to be quiet. Osbon turned off the radios in the aircraft, dimmed his monitors, and sternly admonished the FO for trying to talk on the radio. When Osbon said “we need to take a leap of faith,” the FO stated that he became very worried. Osbon told the FO that “we’re not going to Vegas” and began giving what the FO described as a sermon.
The affidavit states that the FO suggested to Osbon that they invite the off-duty JetBlue captain who was on board the flight into the cockpit; however, Osbon abruptly left the cockpit to go to the forward lavatory, alarming the rest of the flight crew when he didn’t follow the company’s protocol for leaving the cockpit. When flight attendants met Osbon and asked him what was wrong, he became aggressive and banged on the door of the occupied lavatory, saying he needed to get inside.
While Osbon was in the lavatory, at the request of the FO, a flight attendant brought the off-duty captain to the cockpit, where he assisted the FO with the remainder of the flight. When Osbon exited the lavatory, he began talking to flight attendants, mentioning “150 souls on board.” Osbon walked to the rear of the aircraft but along the way stopped and asked a male passenger if he had a problem. Osbon then sprinted back to the forward galley and tried to enter his code to re-enter the cockpit. When the FO announced over the public address system an order to restrain Osbon, several passengers assisted and brought Osbon down in the forward galley, where he continued to yell comments about Jesus, September 11, Iraq, Iran, and terrorists.
The FO declared an emergency and diverted the aircraft to Amarillo, landing with passengers still restraining Osbon in the galley. Osbon was removed from the aircraft and taken to a facility in the Northwest Texas Healthcare System in Amarillo for medical evaluation, where he remains.
A federal complaint is a written statement of the essential facts of the offenses charged and must be made under oath before a magistrate judge. A defendant is entitled to the presumption of innocence until proven guilty. The maximum penalty, upon conviction, for interference with a flight crew is a 20 years in prison and a $250,000 fine. The U.S. Attorney’s Office for the Northern District of Texas has 30 days to present the matter to a grand jury for indictment.
The ongoing investigation is being led by the FBI with the assistance of JetBlue, the Federal Aviation Administration, the Transportation Security Administration, the National Transportation Safety Board, the Amarillo Police Department, and the Rick Husband Amarillo International Airport Police Department.
Assistant U.S. Attorney Christy L. Drake, of the U.S. Attorney’s Office in Amarillo, is in charge of the prosecution.

Corps seeks dismissal of breached levee lawsuit - KansasCity.com

Corps seeks dismissal of breached levee lawsuit - KansasCity.com

Kansas budget deal falls apart - KansasCity.com

Kansas budget deal falls apart - KansasCity.com

More charges for man accused of Congress threats - KansasCity.com

More charges for man accused of Congress threats - KansasCity.com

Official: Winning lottery ticket sold in Maryland - KansasCity.com

Official: Winning lottery ticket sold in Maryland - KansasCity.com

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Thank you.

Jon

Friday, March 30, 2012

Lotto Winner Wisdom

CNBC discusses what it is like to win the lottery with Cynthia Stafford, reality star of TLC's "The Lottery Changed My Life."  Stafford won $112 M five years ago.

To see a video of the interview, click the link below:

http://video.cnbc.com/gallery/?video=3000081325

$5 Gas on the Horizon?

CNBC's Squawk Box cast discusses the rise in gasoline prices with Marvin Odum, president of Shell Oil.  To see the video, click the link below:

http://video.cnbc.com/gallery/?video=3000081466

INHOFE INTRODUCES COLONOGRAPHY SCREENING LEGISLATION

INHOFE INTRODUCES COLONOGRAPHY SCREENING LEGISLATION


 
Contacts: Jared Young 202-224-5762
Liz Lathrop 202-224-1282

March 30, 2012


WASHINGTON, D.C. – In commemoration of Colorectal Cancer Awareness Month, U.S. Sen. Jim Inhofe (R-Okla.) today introduced S. 2265, the CT Colonography Screening for Colorectal Cancer Act of 2012.  The bill’s House companion legislation is H.R. 4165 introduced by Rep. Ralph Hall (R-TX-4).  When detected early, colon cancer is one of the most preventable cancers. This legislation provides greater access to minimally invasive proven screening tools, called CT Colonography, for improved detection.
“This legislation is essential to protecting Americans across the nation from colorectal cancer, one of the most preventable forms, yet second leading causes of cancer deaths,” said Inhofe. “This disease disproportionately affects the elderly, with a rate above 70 percent of all new diagnoses of cancer.  This technology allows patients to utilize a less invasive procedure, instead of opting for the traditional colonoscopies, one that most people are reluctant to undergo.”
Inhofe continued, “Early detection is the key to cancer prevention, and this bill will make this exam more readily available to everyone over the age of 50.  Colorectal cancer is on the rise and the best way to combat it is routine exams and a healthy lifestyle.” 
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